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15 July 2016

Mayday? The Green Guide to the new UK Cabinet

Theresa_May_UK_Home_Office_(cropped)So, another momentous week in UK politics. We get our second ever female Prime Minister in Theresa May and a very new looking cabinet. Here's my quick guide as to who's who from the point of view of the green/Sustainability agenda.

Theresa May, Prime Minister

As with much about Mrs May, her attitude to green issues is a bit of a mystery. Her initial speeches were big on One Nation values when it came to socio-economic issues, but the environment didn't even get a token mention. This isn't encouraging, however BusinessGreen reports that a delegation of 'green Tories' including key lieutenant Amber Rudd sought and secured assurances that a May Government would pursue climate change goals. As always, leadership is key, so Mrs May will need to make her position clearer if the green economy is to thrive.

Philip Hammond, Chancellor of the Exchequer

Predecessor George Osborne was regarded as a serious brake on the green economy over his tenure. Not quite a climate sceptic himself, the 'lukewarmer'/anti-renewables/pro-fracking lobby got a sympathetic hearing from Osborne. The 2010-2015 Coalition Government saw a whole series of pitched battles between the Chancellor and Lib Dem energy and climate secretaries.

Hammond may be seen as exceedingly dull, but in his former role as Foreign Secretary, he made a number of very important speeches on climate change. One in particular caught my eye as it made a case for action from a Conservative point of view to the American Enterprise Institute - using Green Jujitsu in the lions' den. I'm always more interested in right-of-centre arguments for cutting carbon than the traditional lefty case as we need to speak to the unconverted, not preach to the choir.

Overall, we should see the economic brakes easing as Hammond gets into gear.

Amber Rudd, Home Secretary

There's little in Rudd's new brief linked to the low carbon agenda, but given her commitment to the cause, the new Home Secretary will be a key supporter in Cabinet and importantly, as we have seen, she has the PM's ear.

Andrea Leadsom, Environment Secretary Read the rest of this entry »

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11 March 2011

Musings on the Carbon Plan

I leafed through the UK Government's new Carbon Plan on the train to Birmingham on Wednesday. The plan brings together a whole raft of initiatives either underway or promised and doles out responsibility to different Whitehall departments to deliver them by set deadlines. The plan seems to have been well received - if a green pressure group says "we welcome this, but it needs to go further", they actually mean "this is pretty damn good, but we wouldn't be doing our job if we didn't find something to criticise.".

Here are some of my thoughts:

  • Overall the plan is remarkably concise and comprehensive, covering everything from the electricity market to agriculture. The pinning of particular actions on particular departments is very welcome in terms of spreading the responsibility;
  • The amount of Parliamentary bureaucracy is quite staggering - white papers and consultations are legion in the document - no wonder it takes a long time to change the way we do things;
  • It is great to see some of the more challenging programmes (Green Investment Bank & Green New Deal) in the plan with targets. Surely it is not beyond the wit of man to structure both so they are effective and don't bring the Treasury out in a rash - failing that, just the former would do.
  • Some areas that I am evangelical about eg cycling, telecommuting and teleconferencing, are mentioned, but the kind of incentives being thrown at, say, electric vehicles are missing. Arguably the former three would do more for carbon emissions at a fraction of the cost - so why no investment, incentive or even high level support? Sometimes I suspect it comes down to politicians preferring to be photographed at the wheel of a fancy new electric car than using teleconferencing.
  • Likewise the much heralded 'smart grid' is mentioned only in terms of the Govt 'paving the way' towards it, rather than having an action in the plan. I would like to have seen some mention of pilot projects at the very least.

It will be interesting to see how the plan pans out in practice. With the exception of nuclear energy being frowned upon by the Lib Dems, there are no ideological differences between the big three parties, so criticism from Labour is likely to be limited to the quality of implementation and the speed of progress. However, there are high stakes for the coalition Government in terms of public perception. David Cameron needs to deliver on his promise to run The Greenest Government Ever (in reality not that difficult) to show he's not a Thatcherite with a warm handshake, and the Lib Dems need to be able to demonstrate progress on a key part of their ethos to show a return on their involvement in the coalition. It will be interesting, for sure.

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22 June 2009

Are you ready for the CRC?

If you are a UK-based large organisation and you haven't checked whether you will come under the Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) yet, then you'd better get moving. In this presentation, Jane Dennett-Thorpe of The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) explains some of the latest developments as the consultation on the CRC comes to an end (source: edie).

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